Naught to Fear

Halloween Smile

Halloween Smile – photo by Wild Thing

Pumpkins gleam
Witches fly
And Ghosts appear

Rest assured
There’s naught
To fear

All a sign
That Halloween
Will soon be here

Wild Thing ©October 20, 2017

Advertisements

The Legend of “Stingy Jack” (Where Jack O’Lanterns Came From)

Stingy Jack

Stingy Jack – digital art by Wild Thing

People have been making jack-o’-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack.” The Irish brought the tradition of carving pumpkins into Jack O’Lantern to America. But, the original Jack O’Lantern was not a pumpkin. Pumpkins did not exist in Ireland. Ancient Celtic cultures in Ireland carved turnips on All Hallow’s Eve, and placed an ember in them, to ward off evil spirits.

Stingy Jack, a blacksmith by trade, was a miserable old drunk, who took pleasure in playing tricks on just about everyone; family, friends, his mother and yes, even the Devil himself. One night he invited the Devil to have a drink with him. During the evening together, the Devil in his vanity, was showing Jack how he could transform himself into anything he wished, first a barstool, then bird, and so on.

After a time, true to his name, Stingy Jack didn’t want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his wallet next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form.

Oh, how the Devil yelled at Jack. Cursing and telling Jack to let him go. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. Desperate to gain freedom, the Devil agreed. Opening his wallet, Jack let the Devil out.

The next year, the Devil arrived as promised. Jack agreed to follow him if he would only climb up into an apple tree and bring him an apple before he go with the Devil. So, in this way, Jack tricked the Devil into climbing into the tree to pick an apple. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree’s bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years.

Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, while upset by the trick Jack had played on him kept his word not to claim his soul, and would not allow Jack into hell.

“But where can I go?” pleaded Jack.

“Return to where you came from!” the Devil snarled.

Windblown and lost in the dark night, Jack pleaded with the Devil to give him a way to light his way. The Devil, wishing to get rid of Jack, threw him a glowing ember from the fires of Hell. Jack put the coal into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. So, if you see a light in the far off distance wandering here and there on All Hallow’s Eve, tis Stingy Jack roaming the countryside.

The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” and then, simply “Jack O’Lantern.”

In Ireland, people began to make their own versions of Jack’s lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. Immigrants brought the Jack O’Lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o’-lanterns.

Wild Thing

Bouncing Pumpkins

Bouncing Pumpkins

Bouncing Pumpkins – digital Art by Wild Thing

No moonlight
October chill
On a dare
Two girls shiver
Just beyond the field

Farmhouse dark
Stealthy crawl
Damn dog barks
They freeze

No lights appear
Big exhale
They continue
On their mission

Hands find
What they seek
Stifled giggles
Each girl grabs two

Duck waddle now
Back to cover
In darker shadows
Of the trees
Breaking into a run

On the road
Finally, deep breaths
Made it!
Down to work

Each takes one
Raises it
Above her head
Smashes it down
It bounces!

Stunned looks
They pick them up
Do it again
They bounce

Clouds break
Moonlight shines down
Damn pumpkins …
Were green

Wild Thing ©June 19, 2017

Finding My Voice

Finding My Voice

Finding My Voice – by Wild Thing

I am proud to share with you, the announcement of my first book: Finding My Voice. It’s a Collection of what I consider to be my best poems, paired with some of my photos that have been digitally altered by me.

It’s printed on white paper and the art is full color that has a slight gloss to it. It was my goal to create something unique that would be at home on your bookshelf or your coffee table.

The poetry is some works that have appeared here as well as some that is new. It is my hope that you enjoy it as much as I did putting it together for you.

Get your copy today: Finding My Voice by Wild Thing

Wild Thing

Only One . . .

Only One

My Father and I . . . Ft. Hood Tx

There is
Only one man
In my life
Who has never
Let me down

Hard … troubled
Often dark times
For him
Still his presence
A strength

When all others
Have failed me
He’s there

He gets angry
At times
Rebukes me

Praise for me
Is a smile
A short phrase
Not much more

But . . .
Shares with others
Beaming bright
With pride
He tells of me

I never hear this
It’s told me
Via grapevine

Heaven help those
Who hurt me
Through lies
Or betrayal

The God’s wrath
Mere child’s play
His Fury
And vengeance
Is swift

A love for me
So great
It shields
And protects

Only one man
Is all this . . .

He passed away
May 18, 2006
No one has ever
Filled his shoes

Wild Thing ©May10, 2017

Never-Ending Game

Memories - digital art by Wild Thing

It’s the 16th inning
We’ve stretched twice
Bears arrive late
As though it’s
Just begun

Mrs O’Leary’s Cow
Sips “tea” delicately
In her beautiful
Rose chintz china
With a goat
Named Murphy

They give
Color commentary
Their finest brogue
A bit slurred
And funny too

(Sure an’
They’re on
Their 4th “teapot”
Ye know)

Sailor Jack
His dog Bingo
Sell candied
Popcorn and peanuts
To sleepy children

Fans still cheer
As if we’re
Just starting
While #14
Yells from
Right foul pole
“Let’s play two!”

On the field
43 k’s so far
And counting
Bats and records
Starting to break

Leo “The Lip”
Argues with Joe
Behind the plate
Kicks dirt then
Storms away

Players left stranded
Like wallflowers
The Babe claps
Organ music plays us
Into the 17th inning

As Jack Brickhouse
Pours more “tea”
Into rose chintz cups

Wild Thing @May8, 2017