Trapped

Trapped

Trapped – Digital art/poem by Wild Thing

Unable to leave
… not wanting to stay

Living
… a slow death

Wild Thing ©April 22, 2018

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Parkland

Never Again

Digital Art by Wild Thing

Quiet
Tock, tock, breath

Stillness
Heavy weight
Can’t move

Fear
Deep
Soul fear

No life
Above
Shaking

Warm
His blood
Her tears

Finally
All clear
Over

We rise
Cry
Grieve

#neveragain

Wild Thing ©April 4, 2018

Pending

Sirens
Neighbors gather
Coffee cups in hand

The local Miss Havisham
Leaving her home
In a body bag

Jilted late
No children
Kept to herself
In her Mother’s home

Sailed out weekly
To purchase staples
Dressed oddly
Wild hair

Then, back home
Hidden behind closed
Doors and curtains

Her death
As was her life
A mystery

No obituary information
Pending notification
Of kin

Wild Thing ©February 17, 2018

 

Naught to Fear

Halloween Smile

Halloween Smile – photo by Wild Thing

Pumpkins gleam
Witches fly
And Ghosts appear

Rest assured
There’s naught
To fear

All a sign
That Halloween
Will soon be here

Wild Thing ©October 20, 2017

The Legend of “Stingy Jack” (Where Jack O’Lanterns Came From)

Stingy Jack

Stingy Jack – digital art by Wild Thing

People have been making jack-o’-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack.” The Irish brought the tradition of carving pumpkins into Jack O’Lantern to America. But, the original Jack O’Lantern was not a pumpkin. Pumpkins did not exist in Ireland. Ancient Celtic cultures in Ireland carved turnips on All Hallow’s Eve, and placed an ember in them, to ward off evil spirits.

Stingy Jack, a blacksmith by trade, was a miserable old drunk, who took pleasure in playing tricks on just about everyone; family, friends, his mother and yes, even the Devil himself. One night he invited the Devil to have a drink with him. During the evening together, the Devil in his vanity, was showing Jack how he could transform himself into anything he wished, first a barstool, then bird, and so on.

After a time, true to his name, Stingy Jack didn’t want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his wallet next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form.

Oh, how the Devil yelled at Jack. Cursing and telling Jack to let him go. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. Desperate to gain freedom, the Devil agreed. Opening his wallet, Jack let the Devil out.

The next year, the Devil arrived as promised. Jack agreed to follow him if he would only climb up into an apple tree and bring him an apple before he go with the Devil. So, in this way, Jack tricked the Devil into climbing into the tree to pick an apple. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree’s bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years.

Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, while upset by the trick Jack had played on him kept his word not to claim his soul, and would not allow Jack into hell.

“But where can I go?” pleaded Jack.

“Return to where you came from!” the Devil snarled.

Windblown and lost in the dark night, Jack pleaded with the Devil to give him a way to light his way. The Devil, wishing to get rid of Jack, threw him a glowing ember from the fires of Hell. Jack put the coal into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. So, if you see a light in the far off distance wandering here and there on All Hallow’s Eve, tis Stingy Jack roaming the countryside.

The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” and then, simply “Jack O’Lantern.”

In Ireland, people began to make their own versions of Jack’s lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. Immigrants brought the Jack O’Lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o’-lanterns.

Wild Thing

Spirit Freed

Villagers gathers
All come
Mourning begins

Honoring
That life

No matter
How meager
Or great

Sending it on

Old loves
Grudges, debts
Die with it

The Spirit
Now free
Of pettiness

Through
Laughter,
Song, stories,
Love
Fills
Empty hearts

Wild Thing ©July 29, 2017

The Elemental

The Elements

The Elements – photos by Wild Thing

Wild untamed
Free to roam

Fierce
Both in love
And spirit

Like the wind
Hard to capture

Born of the
Energy of fire

Fluid emotions
Powerful

It’s strength
Of earth, itself

Unobtainable
It only comes
If it chooses

A rare gift
To those it’s
Given

It remains
For as long
As you wish

Send it away
It may never
Come back

Like lightning
It seldom
Strikes twice

Wild Thing ©May 3, 2017

Elemental